As of 2017, plans were advancing by the State of New York to host in 2019 the largest international LGBT pride celebration in history, known as Stonewall 50 – WorldPride NYC 2019,[2] to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. In New York City, the Stonewall 50 - WorldPride NYC 2019 events produced by Heritage of Pride will be enhanced through a partnership made with the I ❤ NY program's LGBT division and shall include a welcome center during the weeks surrounding the Stonewall 50 / WorldPride events that will be open to all. Additional commemorative arts, cultural, and educational programming to mark the 50th anniversary of the rebellion at the Stonewall Inn will be taking place throughout the city and the world.[3]
1960年代性革命之前,社会上并没有专门指代非异性恋的中立词汇。最接近中立的词汇是1860年代出现的“第三性”,但这个词并没有在社会上得到广泛接受[12][13][14][15][16][17]。第一个广泛传播的词汇是“同性恋”,但是这个词在1950和1960年代被认为有贬义,所以一度被“同性爱”代替[18],1970年代被“gay”代替[12] 。随着女同性恋受到越来越多的关注,“gay”和“lesbian”的使用变得普遍[1]。女同性恋组织比利提斯的女儿在1970年代提出了女同性恋社群应该更注重哪个方向的争议——应该更关注于女权运动还是同性恋权益[19]。身兼女同性恋身份的女权主义者认为男女平等应优先考量,认为性别分工和男女气质被这个群体认为是父权的象征,不参与当时在酒吧流行的性别角色游戏,也回避男同性恋沙文主义;一些女同性恋的女权主义者不愿意和男同性恋者一起工作[20]。持本质主义观点的女同性恋认为自己生来即为同性恋,倾向于用“lesbian”这个词来形容自己的性倾向,并认为同性恋分离主义和女权主义者的愤怒观点不利于争取同性恋权益。这种态度迅速被双性恋和跨性别人士认可,并一起寻求更大社群的认同[1]。在石墙暴动后的一段时间,即1970和1980年代,男同性恋和女同性恋皆对双性恋和跨性别人士的接纳程度有所降低[21][22]。双性恋被认为是不敢出柜或不能自我认同的同性恋,而跨性别被认为其行为偏离了人们对性别的刻板印象[21]。每个社群都发展出了各自的自我认同,其中包括是否接受其他性别的族群以及如何与其他性别相处的问题,然而这些争论持续至今[22]。

^ Jump up to: a b Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. "GLAAD Media Reference Guide – Transgender glossary of terms" Archived 2012-06-03 at WebCite, "GLAAD", USA, May 2010. Retrieved 2011-02-24. "An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or gender expression differs from what is typically associated with the sex they were assigned at birth."


Between the mid-1990s and the early 2000s, the primary terms used under the transgender umbrella were "female to male" (FtM) for men who transitioned from female to male, and "male to female" (MtF) for women who transitioned from male to female. These terms have now been superseded by "trans man" and "trans woman", respectively, and the terms "trans-masculine" or "trans-feminine" are increasingly in use.[29] This shift in preference from terms highlighting biological sex ("transsexual", "FtM") to terms highlighting gender identity and expression ("transgender", "trans woman") reflects a broader shift in the understanding of transgender people's sense of self and the increasing recognition of those who decline medical reassignment as part of the transgender community.[29]
Same-sex sexual activity is a crime in 70 countries, and can get you a death sentence in nine countries, including Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sudan and Yemen. And even where these restrictive laws are not actually enforced, their very existence reinforces prejudice against LGBTI people, leaving them feeling like they have no protection against harassment, blackmail and violence.
In the Netflix original series Orange is the New Black the main character, Piper Chapman, played by actress Taylor Schilling, is a bisexual female inmate who is shown having relationships with both men and women. In season one, before entering the prison, Piper is engaged to male fiancé Larry Bloom, played by actor Jason Biggs. Then, upon entering the prison, she reconnects with former lover (and fellow inmate), Alex Vause, played by Laura Prepon.[119][120] Another character who is portrayed as bisexual in the show is an inmate named Lorna Morello, played by actress Yael Stone. She has an intimate relationship with fellow inmate Nicky Nichols, played by Natasha Lyonne, while still yearning for her male “fiance”, Christopher MacLaren, played by Stephen O'Reilly.[120]
A seven-colour rainbow flag is a common symbol of the international cooperative movement. The rainbow flag has been the cooperative emblem since 1921 when the International Co-operative Congress of World Co-op Leaders met in Basel, Switzerland to identify and define the growing cooperative movement’s common values and ideals to help unite co-ops around the world.

Many homosexual and bisexual individuals have a problem with the use of the pink triangle symbol as it was the symbol that Hitler's regime used to tag homosexuals (similar to the yellow Star of David that is constituted of two opposed, overlapping triangles). Because pink triangles were used in the persecution of homosexuals in the Nazi regime, a double moon symbol was devised specifically to avoid the use of triangles.[41] This bisexual symbol is a double moon that is formed when the sex-specific attributes of the astrological symbol of Mars & Venus (representing heterosexual union) are reduced to the two circles open on both ends, thus symbolizing that bisexuals are open to either-sex unions. The color of the bisexual double moon symbol varies. The symbol is most often displayed with rainbow colors, signifying that bisexuals belong to the gay community. It also may appear with the pink-purple-blue colors of the bisexual pride flag. The double moon symbol is common in Germany and surrounding countries.[41]
The introduction of same-sex marriage (also called marriage equality) has varied by jurisdiction, and came about through legislative change to marriage law, court rulings based on constitutional guarantees of equality, recognition that it is allowed by existing marriage law,[3] or by direct popular vote (via referendums and initiatives). The recognition of same-sex marriage is considered to be a human right and a civil right as well as a political, social, and religious issue.[4] The most prominent supporters of same-sex marriage are human rights and civil rights organizations as well as the medical and scientific communities, while the most prominent opponents are religious fundamentalist groups. Polls consistently show continually rising support for the recognition of same-sex marriage in all developed democracies and in some developing democracies.
On June 26, 2015, the US Supreme Court ruled that gay marriage is a right protected by the US Constitution in all 50 states. Prior to their decision, same-sex marriage was already legal in 37 states and Washington DC, but was banned in the remaining 13. US public opinion had shifted significantly over the years, from 27% approval of gay marriage in 1996 to 55% in 2015, the year it became legal throughout the United States, to 61% in 2019.
Legal procedures exist in some jurisdictions which allow individuals to change their legal gender or name to reflect their gender identity. Requirements for these procedures vary from an explicit formal diagnosis of transsexualism, to a diagnosis of gender identity disorder, to a letter from a physician that attests the individual's gender transition or having established a different gender role.[96] In 1994, the DSM IV entry was changed from "Transsexual" to "Gender Identity Disorder". In many places, transgender people are not legally protected from discrimination in the workplace or in public accommodations.[20] A report released in February 2011 found that 90% of transgender people faced discrimination at work and were unemployed at double the rate of the general population,[18] and over half had been harassed or turned away when attempting to access public services.[18] Members of the transgender community also encounter high levels of discrimination in health care.[97]
Frank Kameny soon realized the pivotal change brought by the Stonewall riots. An organizer of gay activism in the 1950s, he was used to persuasion, trying to convince heterosexuals that gay people were no different than they were. When he and other people marched in front of the White House, the State Department and Independence Hall only five years earlier, their objective was to look as if they could work for the U.S. government.[36] Ten people marched with Kameny then, and they alerted no press to their intentions. Although he was stunned by the upheaval by participants in the Annual Reminder in 1969, he later observed, "By the time of Stonewall, we had fifty to sixty gay groups in the country. A year later there was at least fifteen hundred. By two years later, to the extent that a count could be made, it was twenty-five hundred."[37]
In Istanbul (since 2003) and in Ankara (since 2008) gay marches were being held each year with an increasing participation. Gay pride march in Istanbul started with 30 people in 2003 and in 2010 the participation became 5,000. The pride March 2011 and 2012 were attended by more than 15,000 participants. On June 30, 2013, the pride parade attracted almost 100,000 people.[113] The protesters were joined by Gezi Park protesters, making the 2013 Istanbul Pride the biggest pride ever held in Turkey.[114] On the same day, the first Izmir Pride took place with 2000 participants.[115] Another pride took place in Antalya.[116] Politicians of the biggest opposition party, CHP and another opposition party, BDP also lent their support to the demonstration.[117] The pride march in Istanbul does not receive any support of the municipality or the government.[118]
Apart from measures to protect the prerogatives of citizens, the prosecution of homosexuality as a general crime began in the 3rd century of the Christian era when male prostitution was banned by Philip the Arab. By the end of the 4th century, after the Roman Empire had come under Christian rule, passive homosexuality was punishable by burning.[50] "Death by sword" was the punishment for a "man coupling like a woman" under the Theodosian Code.[51] Under Justinian, all same-sex acts, passive or active, no matter who the partners, were declared contrary to nature and punishable by death.[52]
I don't know what is in other people's minds. For example I can't fathom how a man can be exclusively gay with no attraction to women sexually. But it must be so. I have a natural and easy time being dominant with women and fucking. I have a naturally submissive and what feels like a feminine side which takes over if I'm horny for a dominant male, and I only have desires for a dominant male. I used to be homophobic in college even though I already knew for years what my secret desire was. I had angry reactions to a flamboyant gay man once in college, not physical but very rude to him when he talked to me. I think I thought of him as the typical gay guy and was strongly resisting becoming him. Now I'm older and have had time to mature, gay guys with a swoosh in their step don't bother me. I can't say I love "them" now bcuz ecery group has it's good and bad. Live and let live though. I told my wife about it a little. I'm not ashamed and have never been troubled about it. This is my thing though, I don't feel that I am gay. I feel like I have a feminine side that is attracted to a strong man sexually. That being said I have had cocks in my mouth and been on my hands and knees.

Read the latest on bisexuality from The Advocate. Browse the most recent commentary pieces from contributors, breaking news about political and cultural developments that affect the bisexual community, updates about bisexual public figures like YouTube’s R.J. Aguiar and Eliel Cruz, and reports about statistics related to bisexuality like bi erasure and discrimination. Find out about bisexual celebrities like Lady Gaga, Alan Cumming, Anna Paquin, and more, who are giving an international spotlight and voice for this community.
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